Major Objectives

Particulars Scope
Developing a comprehensive understanding of the Gems and Jewellery (GJ) Sector including overview of the gems and jewellery value chain from raw material source to retail.
  • Identification/Mapping of Gems and Jewellery clusters across India
  • Manpower Mapping/Technology Mapping of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
  • Value Chain Analysis of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
Assessment of the Contribution of Gems and Jewellery (GJ) Sector in Indian economy in terms of (1) income and (2) employment considering direct and indirect channels
  • Mapping Of Economic Parameters of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
  • Contribution of the Gems and Jewellery sector to the Indian Economy
Identification of variables which affect domestic and export demand. And, develop strategy and initiatives that GJEPC could undertake to improve exports of the Indian Gems and Jewellery sector.
  • Export Competitiveness of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
  • Value Chain Analysis of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
Assessment of India's manufacturing potential and supply constraints with respect to infrastructure, skill development, production system and logistic gaps; and recommendations to overcome such gaps.- Covered via Skill and Technology gap chapters
  • Skill And Technology Mapping of the Gems and Jewellery Sector
  • Value Chain Analysis of the Gems and Jewellery Sector

Stakeholders

  • Manufacturing units
  • Traders
  • Exporters
  • Association members

Expected Outcome/Impact

  • Profile of workers and Units across Regions
  • Skill Mapping and Gaps
  • Technology Mapping and Gaps
  • Mapping of Economic Parameters
  • Trade Competitiveness
  • Value Chains- Input Sources and Output Destinations
  • Impact of Demonetisation, GST and Other Government Policies
  • Contribution of G&J sector
  • Way forward- Policy implications

Brief Methodology

  • Fresh Primary Sample Survey – 6,743 units across India for different segments of the G&J sector
  • Analysis of Available Surveys – Labour Bureau, NSSO, Enterprise Survey, National Accounts Statistics, CSO

The sampling methodology is as follows:

The entire country was divided into 6 regions

  • North (Delhi, Haryana, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh)
  • East (Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, Tripura and West Bengal)
  • West (Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra)
  • South (Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Telangana)
  • Gujarat and Rajasthan

Of the total sample units, 5088 were selected from urban areas and remaining 1655 from rural areas

Using Economic Census data, the urban areas (wards), within each region, were classified into four strata on the basis of number of units. These classes are wards with:

  • North (Delhi, Haryana, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh)
  • East (Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, Tripura and West Bengal)
  • West (Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra)
  • South (Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Telangana)
  • Gujarat and Rajasthan

Similarly, rural areas (villages), within each region, were classified into two strata:

  • villages having >4 units and
  • villages having <= 4 units.

A stratified multistage sample design was adopted.

For selection of urban sample, towns, wards/ blocks and units were the first, second and third stage respectively while villages and units were the two stages of selection for rural sample.

List of states where the study was conducted

Andhra Pradesh
Assam
Bihar
Delhi
Gujarat
Haryana
Jharkhand
Karnataka
Kerala
Madhya Pradesh
Maharashtra
Orissa
Punjab
Rajasthan
Tamil Nadu
Telangana
Tripura
Uttar Pradesh
West Bengal

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